Old Boys Rugby to wear pink socks during game for Women’s Refuge

Timaru Old Boys Senior Rugby B Team members show off the pink socks the team will wear on Saturday for their game against the Mackenzie Rams.

AIMAN AMERUL MUNER/Stuff

Timaru Old Boys Senior Rugby B Team members show off the pink socks the team will wear on Saturday for their game against the Mackenzie Rams.

Women involved with a Timaru sports club will be acknowledged on Saturday, with members of one of its rugby teams donning bright pink socks to show their gratitude.

The Old Boys Ladies Day will feature high tea and pink socks, with raffles, donations and a bake-off to raise funds for the Mid-South Island Women’s Refuge and Family Safety Services, and the refuge’s chief executive is welcoming the initiative.

The festivities will take place before the Old Boys B rugby match against the Mackenzie Rams at the Old Boys’ clubrooms on Quarry Rd, where Old Boys players will wear “bright” pink socks.

“I was a bit shocked when they arrived, and I saw how pink they are, but at least they will be a striking visual on the pitch,” event organizer Owen Martin said.

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The pink socks being worn on the field.

AIMAN AMERUL MUNER/Stuff

The pink socks being worn on the field.

“We wanted to thank the ladies of the club, because they are the ones that support us from practices and game days, serve at the bar and many other things.

“We also wanted to raise money and donate to Women’s Refuge, so the money donated from raffles and donations on the day will go towards Mid-South Island Women’s Refuge and Family Services.”

Mid-South Island Women’s Refuge and Family Services chief executive Dawn Rangi-Smith said it welcomed anyone willing to donate.

She said it was great to see rugby clubs taking a stance on domestic violence.

“Rugby clubs are taking the issue very seriously now, and make big efforts to reduce domestic violence in their clubs,” she said.

“They make pretty clear expectations with their members.”

Jarrid Cooper puts on his socks ahead of Saturday's ladies day.

AIMAN AMERUL MUNER/Stuff

Jarrid Cooper puts on his socks ahead of Saturday’s ladies day.

For one of the rugby team’s members who will be on the pitch on Saturday, donations for women’s refuge mean a lot.

Player Jarrid Cooper’s great grandmother was trailblazing Māori leader Dame Whina Cooper who was elected the first president of Te Rōpū Wāhine Māori Toko I te Ora (Māori Women’s Welfare League), Cooper said.

The biopic Whina is out in cinemas now.

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